A H Shaw (c1855?)

Alfred Henry ShawAge: 7618321908

Name
Alfred Henry Shaw
Given names
Alfred Henry
Surname
Shaw
Birth 8 August 1832 39 40
MiscBirth 1832

Note: All the known sources agree on his birthplace being Huddersfield, Yorkshire, but this may not tell t…
Residence 1841 (Age 8)
Death of a sisterIsabella Shaw
23 May 1846 (Age 13)
Religion
Noncomformist
about 1850 (Age 17)

Note: Throughout his life in Australia, Alfred was heavily involved in the activities of various non-confo…
Occupation
Warehouseman
1851 (Age 18)
Immigration
from Liverpool in the "North Atlantic"
2 April 1853 (Age 20)
Note: His brother Joseph had arrived the previous October so one could guess that after spending a couple …
Occupation
"some sort of business"
July 1853 (Age 20)
Note: The town was in a gold rush frenzy but there is no indication that he went to the diggings. His daughter Olive provides a clue - "After his arrival in Australia he established some sort of business in Robe Street, St Kilda". Did he try his hand there as a carpenter or joiner?
MarriageHannah HeywoodView family
12 July 1854 (Age 21)
Shared note: Witnesses : Joseph Horsfall and Sarah Heywood
Occupation
Tinsmith
about 1854 (Age 21)
Note: Before his marriage Alfred had begun working with brother Joseph. From his obituary in the Australa…
Joseph Shaw Gravestone
Joseph Shaw Gravestone

Note: Wesleyan B Melbourne General Cemetery

MiscMarriage 12 July 1854 (Age 21)

Note: There are some strong indications that Alfred knew Hannah from Huddersfield. In 1851 Hannah's famil…
Death of a brotherJoseph Shaw
28 February 1855 (Age 22)
Burial of a brotherJoseph Shaw
28 February 1855 (Age 22)
Occupation
Tinsmith
1855 (Age 22)
Note: This was the time of the "later" gold rushes with more than 50,000 diggers passing through Melbourne…
Queens Wharf, Melbourne, West End, 1857.
Queens Wharf, Melbourne, West End, 1857.

Note: Queens Wharf, Melbourne, West End, 1857.

Death of a motherIsabella Garnet
15 February 1856 (Age 23)
Birth of a son
#1
Alfred Heywood Shaw
14 January 1858 (Age 25)
Birth of a son
#2
Arthur Henry Shaw
15 June 1859 (Age 26)
Occupation 1860 (Age 27)
Note: In 1863, about when this photo was taken, Alfred and Hannah had four children and were living at «a …
Birth of a daughter
#3
Amelia Sarah Shaw
14 July 1861 (Age 28)
Birth of a daughter
#4
Lavinia Shaw
26 November 1862 (Age 30)
Death of a sisterSusanna Alicia Shaw
4 April 1864 (Age 31)
Birth of a son
#5
Ernest Shaw
27 May 1864 (Age 31)
Death of a fatherWilliam Henry Shaw
21 August 1866 (Age 34)
Birth of a son
#6
Luther (M) Shaw
6 September 1866 (Age 34)
Death of a sonLuther (M) Shaw
16 November 1866 (Age 34)
Burial of a sonLuther (M) Shaw
17 November 1866 (Age 34)
Occupation 1867 (Age 34)

Note: In 1867 Alfred closed down his retail business in Elizabeth Street and went to buy stock in London (…

Corner of Elizabeth and Little Collins St. 1870

Note: Title: [Corner of Elizabeth and Little Collins St.] [picture]

Birth of a daughter
#7
Effie Shaw
9 March 1868 (Age 35)
Occupation
Hardware Store
1868 (Age 35)
Note: The 1868 directory shows the address of Alfred Shaw & Co as 42 Little Collins St West, likely a …
Alfred Shaw & Co Warehouse 1871
Alfred Shaw & Co Warehouse 1871

Note: Creator: Winston, engraver.

Birth of a son
#8
Herbert Shaw
13 October 1869 (Age 37)
Residence about 1870 (Age 37)
Birth of a daughter
#9
Eva Shaw
13 March 1871 (Age 38)
Death of a sisterFrances Caroline Shaw
after 1871 (Age 38)

Event
Australasian stamping factory
1874 (Age 41)
Note: "In 1874 the firm started the Australasian stamping factory in Franklin-street, being the first in the colonies to manufacture heavy stamped ware such as milk dishes, frying pans and the like. The factory is a substantial building, covering nearly a quarter of an acre and employing about 80 hands" (Sutherland). In March 1877 the Illustrated Australian News published this picture and noted that it "shows the factory on the corner of Franklin and Stewart Streets known as the Australian Tin Stamping and Japanning Works; three storey building, iron bars over the ground floor windows." The sign on the building shows "Shaw & McNaughton", the McNaughton probably being Duncan McNaughton an Ironmonger at 99 High street, St Kilda in 1870 and then later at Argyle St, St Kilda. Sands & McDougall directory entries for Alfred Shaw & Co included 8 Franklin St until 1896.
Death of a sisterHarriet Shaw
2 March 1875 (Age 42)
Burial of a sisterHarriet Shaw
3 March 1875 (Age 42)
Occupation 1875 (Age 42)
Note: "In 1875 they purchased the hardware business of Messrs. Ward Brothers of Queen Street, Brisbane and…

Death of a wifeHannah Heywood
29 August 1884 (Age 52)
Burial of a wifeHannah Heywood
30 August 1884 (Age 52)
Death 1884 (Age 51)
Note: The photo at the right was taken in the front garden not too long afterwards judging by the black armbands. As far as I can work out it shows Lavina, Amelia, Alfred (Jnr), (unknown), Effie, (unknown), Ernest and Eva.
Marriage of a childAlfred Heywood ShawCharlotte Alice HarveyView family
17 May 1885 (Age 52)
MarriageMargaret Susan WilsonView family
11 November 1886 (Age 54)
Residence 1886 (Age 53)
Note: the minister at his marriage was Alfred Rowland and in 1901 an Alfred Rowland, Congregational Minist…
WitnessMargaret Susan WilsonView family
Marriage
1886 (Age 53)
Marriage of a childJohn James MooreAmelia Sarah ShawView family
25 April 1887 (Age 54)
Marriage of a childErnest ShawEthel MeeresView family
20 October 1887 (Age 55)
Residence 1887 (Age 54)
Note: Although the exact date is uncertain the photo of Alfred at the right would date from around the time of the move to Brighton.
Birth of a daughter
#10
Marguerite Eileen Shaw
19 January 1888 (Age 55)
Marriage of a childArthur Henry ShawVictoria Louisa ChamberlainView family
28 March 1888 (Age 55)
Occupation
Bank Commissioner
November 1888 (Age 56)
Note: There's probably a lot to be written about this role considering the immininent crash. From the few…
Birth of a daughter
#11
Olive Garnet Shaw
27 December 1889 (Age 57)
Birth of a daughter
#12
Ailsa Wilson Shaw
15 February 1892 (Age 59)
Marriage of a childTheophilus Pine FelsteadEva ShawView family
17 January 1894 (Age 61)
Marriage of a childHorace SummersEffie ShawView family
25 May 1897 (Age 64)
Occupation
Hardware Merchant / Councillor
1898 (Age 65)
Note: With the assistance of a former employee, by then a senior partner in ironmongers Drake and Stubbs w…
Residence before December 1898 (Age 66)
Note: We know that the family left Brighton for Perth in November 1894 and there a number of references to…
Marriage of a childHerbert ShawCaroline Mary HaleView family
11 October 1900 (Age 68)
Residence 1901 (Age 68)
Note: According to his daughter Olive, he "left Kalgoorlie in November 1901 and rented a house in Applecro…
Death 17 August 1908 (Age 76)
Burial 19 August 1908 (2 days after death)
Family with parents - View family
father
mother
 
Marriage: 9 August 1816St John, Wakefield, Yorkshire
17 months
elder sister
23 months
elder brother
John Shaw
Christening: 22 November 1818Saint Peter, Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England
Death: 1831
20 months
elder sister
5 years
elder sister
2 years
elder brother
Joseph Shaw
Birth: calculated 1826 33 34Huddersfield, Yorkshire
Death: 28 February 1855Cardigan St, Melbourne
5 years
elder sister
Isabella Shaw
Birth: from 1828 to 1830 35 36Yorkshire
Death: 23 May 18465 Ramsden St, Huddersfield
4 years
elder sister
19 months
Family with Hannah Heywood - View family
wife
 
Marriage: 12 July 1854Ministers House, Albert St, Collingwood, Melbourne
4 years
son
004_005C.jpgAlfred Heywood Shaw
Birth: 14 January 1858 25 27260 Elizabeth St, Melbourne
Death: 31 August 1931Ravenswood Private Hospital, Alma Road, St Kilda
17 months
son
2 years
daughter
16 months
daughter
18 months
son
2 years
son
Luther (M) Shaw
Birth: 6 September 1866 34 36Balaclava Rd, E. St Kilda
Death: 16 November 1866"Reddish House", 21 Tivoli Place, South Yarra, Melbourne
18 months
daughter
19 months
son
17 months
daughter
Family with Margaret Susan Wilson - View family
wife
 
Marriage: 11 November 1886Congregational Church, Crouch End, North London
14 months
daughter
23 months
daughter
2 years
daughter

Birth

Shows age as 21 and birthplace Huddersfield, Yorkshire

Birth

Shows birthdate as Aug 6th (but year as 55?)

Birth

shows birth date as 8th Aug 1832

MiscBirth

All the known sources agree on his birthplace being Huddersfield, Yorkshire, but this may not tell the full story. Although it is probable that he was baptised at St Peter's in central Huddersfield he may have been born in the tiny village of Lane about 10km south. Alfred's oldest brother John was baptised at St Peter's but at the time his father's abode was given as Lane. This was also the case for Alfred's father and two aunts although in later censuses his father gave his birthplace as Huddersfield.

There are trade directory entries in 1822 and 1834 for a Joseph Shaw, Cloth Dresser of Lane, and then in 1837 for "Shaw Widow" of the Lane dye works. This does raise the possibility that Alfred's father, also a Cloth Dresser, may have been living in Lane for at least some of the years between 1820 and 1841.

Religion

Throughout his life in Australia, Alfred was heavily involved in the activities of various non-conformist churches.

There are only hints as to when this move away from the established church of his forebears occurred. As far as is known the baptismal rites for all the Shaws of Alfred and his father's generations and likely beyond took place in the parish church of St Peter, Huddersfield. We know that his father was married in the Wakefield parish church. I'm not sure that this rules out an independent leaning within this part of his family but for the families of his mother and his wife there are well documented non-conformist influences

Isabella Garnet was baptised in 1791 in Hull at the Fish Street Independent Chapel and there are strong indications that before that her family was connected with the Zion Independent Chapel in Bridlington to the north.

Hannah Heywood and her siblings were probably baptised in parish churches but her mother, Dinah Turton, and her siblings were baptised in Independent, Congregational or Wesleyan chapels. It is likely that this was the influence that led to Alfred and Hannah being married by the Collingwood Wesleyan Methodist minister in 1854.

There are strong indications that Alfred's siblings favoured the independent church as well. Brother Joseph was buried in the Wesleyan section of Melbourne Cemetery in 1855, sisters Frances and Amelia were both married in Independent Chapels in the 1860s, and as early as 1851 Harriet's husband had given up his trade as a joiner and become a Baptist Minister. There is even a tantalising hint that Alfred's father may have become some sort of lay preacher before his death in 1866 with an 1864 directory entry listing a Reverend William Shaw of Eightlands House close by his last recorded address.

From at least as early as 1870 he was involved with the Church of Christ in Australia. Initially this was in Balaclava where fellow ironmonger Benjamin Hill was also involved. Later he was involved with the Swanston Street church and according to their web site he assisted with the purchase of the church building (pictured) ......

"In 1881, the Swanston Street congregation became tenants of the John Knox church, continuing in that capacity until 1883 when the building was purchased from the Presbyterian Church for £4,500. The building was sold at auction and was bought by Mr. Alfred Shaw, a member of the Swanston Street church, and it was offered by him to the church for the same amount that he paid for it."

He seems to have been held in high esteem within the church with A B Maston's 1903 history listing his name with five others including Robert Service, father the Victorian premier, James Service. It goes on to describe them as "men who did good and solid work in the cause of primitive christianity. These names should always be held in honourable remembrance for the part they played in the early struggles of the church to gain a foothold and make headway".

After his move to the west he continued his involvement and was the President of the first Perth Conference in 1898 and then of the first Goldfields' Conference in Kalgoorlie in 1901.

Immigration

His brother Joseph had arrived the previous October so one could guess that after spending a couple of months looking around goldrush Melbourne Joseph had written and encouraged his younger brother to join him. Alfred may already have left England as according to his daughter Olive writing in 1962 he "emigrated to America as a youth but didn't stay long".

The passenger records for the brothers' voyages do raise a question about their occupations. All the other details agree with what we know but Alfred is recorded as being a Joiner and Joseph a Draper. It is possible that Alfred foresaw the value of this trade in the booming colony and maybe Joseph planned to take advantage of his family connections as a cloth importer and dealer. It is also possible that Alfred had served at least part of an apprenticeship as a Joiner. It seems unlikely that his father wouldn't have secured him in some sort of trade or profession. Could his brief American trip have been prior to 1851 apprenticed to a ship's carpenter?

Occupation

The town was in a gold rush frenzy but there is no indication that he went to the diggings. His daughter Olive provides a clue - "After his arrival in Australia he established some sort of business in Robe Street, St Kilda". Did he try his hand there as a carpenter or joiner?

Occupation

OS 1962

Marriage

Witnesses : Joseph Horsfall and Sarah Heywood

Occupation

Before his marriage Alfred had begun working with brother Joseph. From his obituary in the Australasian Hardware and Machinery Journal from 1908 ".... he was not brought up to the hardware but to the soft-goods trade. Until, in the early fifties he landed in Australia, he had never touched the industrial metals. In Melbourne, however, he found a brother who was engaged in the making and selling tinware, and this brother dying before long, the business fell, accidently as it were, into his hands." Brother Joseph, aged 30, died in February 1855 and was buried in the then newly established Melbourne General Cemetery. Like his sister Isabella 9 years earlier and sister Susanna 10 years later he died from "Phthisis" (Tuberculosis). His headstone still stands and includes inscriptions for two of his sister Amelia's children who share the grave with him.

Alfred's 1854 address in "North Melbourne" cannot be confirmed but it seems likely that the two brothers, unmarried and starting a business together, would have shared at their place of work. Joseph died at an address in Cardigan St, Melbourne and at that time the business was described as being "started near Queensberry-street" which intersects Cardigan in what probably was considered "North Melbourne" (what is now West and North Melbourne was then known as Hotham).

MiscMarriage

There are some strong indications that Alfred knew Hannah from Huddersfield. In 1851 Hannah's family was living at Crofthead just around the corner from the Shaws' home in Ramsden Street. Hannah was probably living there as well but on census night she was visiting her uncle Hugh Mellor and aunt Mary (nee Turton) Mellor at Jackson's Bridge, Holmfirth. This introduces a further possible link in that Hugh Mellor is described as a Woollen Miller and in 1861 as a Woollen Cloth Manufacturer. With Holmfirth only a mile or two up the road from Lane it seems likely that Alfred's family with its wool dying enterprise and the Mellors would have been acquainted. The Mellor-Turton-Heywood connection is strengthened with Hannah's sister Sarah also in the area in 1851 staying with Andrew Mellor a Woollen Yarn Manufacturer married to Mary Mellor/Turton's sister Elizabeth. It is worth noting that in 1851 Sarah and Hannah were described as Dressmakers, the occupation of Alfred's sisters.

Occupation

This was the time of the "later" gold rushes with more than 50,000 diggers passing through Melbourne. All would have needed basic hardware and Alfred's business was there to supply them. He expanded into rural Victoria and "a branch was opened in Ballarat and others in Chiltern, Indigo and Wahgunyah".

By mid 1856 Alfred would have received the news of his mother's death back in Yorkshire. Coming so soon after the death of his brother he must have felt the loss badly. It would have been some comfort to see his Australian family begin to grow with son Alfred being born at Elizabeth Street in early 1858 then the marriages of two of Hannah's sisters and the arrival of some nephews. At the time of their marriages (and that of Hannah) it seems likely the the sisters were living with their mother Dinah Heywood and youngest daughter Ellen in Collingwood.

Occupation

In 1863, about when this photo was taken, Alfred and Hannah had four children and were living at «a href="../../TheNest.htm" target=_blank»The Nest«/a» in Balaclava Road. The business had also moved. From 1860 until 1867 the directory listed Alfred Shaw as an Ironmonger of 234/236 Elizabeth Street. In 1862 a premises was also listed in Dryburgh Street, Hotham, just down from the SW corner of the intersection with Queensberry Street and at that time bordering on swamp land.

The 1859-60 gold rush centred on the Indigo lead between Chiltern and Wahgunyah in Victoria's north had proved "relatively unproductive and on the perimeter of previous activity" (Serle p218) but things were happening in New Zealand. "Constituting the country's biggest gold strike, the discovery of gold in Otago led to a rapid influx of foreign miners - many of them veterans of other hunts for the precious metal in California and Victoria. The rush started at Gabriel's Gully but spread throughout much of Central Otago, leading to the rapid expansion and commercialisation of the new colonial settlement of Dunedin , which quickly grew to be New Zealand's largest city." (Wikipaedia) The Otago gold rush reached a peak in late 1861. Not long after that gold was discovered on the West Coast causing a heavy influx of miners to the Hokitika area peaking between 1864 and 1866. Alfred's country branches were sold and new ones opened in Dunedin and Hokitika. They were put under the management of Matthew Gill, formerly employed at Elizabeth Street and later to run the London office.

Occupation

In 1867 Alfred closed down his retail business in Elizabeth Street and went to buy stock in London (Sutherland). His father had died in Aug 1866 so it is possible the trip had to do with sorting out family affairs in Yorkshire.

There were now five children at Balaclava Rd. A sixth, Luther, had died aged 2 months in November 1866 at the South Yarra home of Hannah's sister Mary Clarke. I haven't been able to find Alfred on the inward or outward passenger lists but from Effie's birth date in March 1868 he must have left for London sometime after June 1867 and according to Sutherland, returned in early 1868 . The round trip may have taken more than six months so he may not have been back for the birth. This is supported by the informant for the birth being Frank Payne, a gardener employed by Alfred and resident at Balaclava Rd although he had also been the informant for Luther's birth. Family lore tells that the children's nurse, «a href="./3917.htm" target=_blank»Teeny«/a», was also living with the family and was to remain with them for more than fifty years.

Before the voyage a Henry Hughes joined the firm. It is uncertain as to his position but by 1870 and then for most years until 1884 his name appears alongside Alfred's in the directory. In 1870 Henry shared an address with John Hughes, a partner in Hughes & Harvey, which was a well established Melbourne tinsmith and ironmonger formed about the same time as Alfred Shaw & Co. It seems likely that John was related to Henry, possibly his father. By 1877 John Hughes may have died as he no longer appeared as a partner in Hughes and Harvey.

The connection between the two firms was to become even stronger. In 1885, Charlotte Alice Harvey, the daughter of the remaining partner, Robert Joseph Harvey, was to marry Alfred Shaw's oldest son, also Alfred. In 1889 the two companies merged becoming Harvey, Shaw and Co. carrying on into the twentieth century with R J Harvey and the younger Alfred Shaw as partners.

Occupation

The 1868 directory shows the address of Alfred Shaw & Co as 42 Little Collins St West, likely a temporary premises arranged for the period Alfred was overseas. The following year the firm was at 13 Little Collins Street West (later renumbered to 360 Little Collins) where the firm was to maintain a presence until well into the following century. The indications are that in 1869 he used a bluestone warehouse already on the site before incorporating it as part of the ground floor of a new three story building. During the construction he used 38 Elizabeth Street around the corner as his business address. The new building, completed in late 1871 had "a frontage of 40 ft. to Little Collins-street and a depth of 127 ft., containing a cellar, ground floor and two upper flats, each floor being occupied by all the various articles of a complete wholesale hardware business" (Sutherland). The bluestone wall along Gill's Alley with its arched cart entry is still standing having been incorporated into a 1930s renovation carried out when the building passed to Guest's Furniture Removalists. Benjamin Hill whose family jewellery business bought the building in the 1970s recalled evidence of stables being discovered when the rear of the building was excavated for a truck rental company.

"The growth of the business rendered it needful to establish a London office, which Mr. Shaw opened at 72 Gracechurch-street in 1872. The New Zealand businesses were wound up and Mr. Gill took charge of the London office" (Sutherland). Matthew Gill can be found in London in 1881. He is described as an "Australian Merchant" and is living with his wife Elizabeth next door to the Havestock Hill Congregational Church. Considering Alfred's connection with non-conformist denominations it may not have been coincidence. (I don't know the origin of the "Gill" in Gill's Alley but it does suggest at least a possibility that theere is a connection to this Gill).

Occupation

OS 1962

Event

"In 1874 the firm started the Australasian stamping factory in Franklin-street, being the first in the colonies to manufacture heavy stamped ware such as milk dishes, frying pans and the like. The factory is a substantial building, covering nearly a quarter of an acre and employing about 80 hands" (Sutherland). In March 1877 the Illustrated Australian News published this picture and noted that it "shows the factory on the corner of Franklin and Stewart Streets known as the Australian Tin Stamping and Japanning Works; three storey building, iron bars over the ground floor windows." The sign on the building shows "Shaw & McNaughton", the McNaughton probably being Duncan McNaughton an Ironmonger at 99 High street, St Kilda in 1870 and then later at Argyle St, St Kilda. Sands & McDougall directory entries for Alfred Shaw & Co included 8 Franklin St until 1896.

Occupation

"In 1875 they purchased the hardware business of Messrs. Ward Brothers of Queen Street, Brisbane and placed it under the management of Mr. T.E.White whom they admitted as a partner in the Brisbane business. This branch soon developed into by far the largest hardware trade in Queensland, their stores now covering nearly an acre and a half" (Sutherland). The following year they exhibited at the Brisbane Exhibition.

"..... Early in 1888 they purchased the hardware business of Messrs. McPherson & Co. of Townsville placing the same in charge of Messrs. Moore and Rodgers, two young men formerly in their Brisbane branch but who now have an interest in the Townsville branch. The stores of the firm cover nearly three-quarters of an acre and their business is by far the largest in Northern Queensland." (Sutherland)

Death

The photo at the right was taken in the front garden not too long afterwards judging by the black armbands. As far as I can work out it shows Lavina, Amelia, Alfred (Jnr), (unknown), Effie, (unknown), Ernest and Eva.

Marriage

Marriages from Times 13 Nov 1886

Residence

the minister at his marriage was Alfred Rowland and in 1901 an Alfred Rowland, Congregational Minister is living at 20 Crescent Road, Crouch End. In the same year further down the street is a house "Strathearn" occupied by a Charles Herbert Pritchard. Strathearn would have been on th enorth side of Crescent Road at about number 9 and not quite opposite the house of Alfred Rowland. From an aerial map it looks like Strathearn has been replaced by a block of flats although the rest of the street looks to be 19C vintage. On looking at the 1891 census Strathearn with another house, Ellendale, is between numbers 11 and 7 Crescent Road and 7 is the last address before Coolhurst Road so it is just possible it may still be standing.

Residence

Although the exact date is uncertain the photo of Alfred at the right would date from around the time of the move to Brighton.

Occupation

There's probably a lot to be written about this role considering the immininent crash. From the few sources I've uncovered Alfred's part was minor, lasting only until about May 1890 when he was one of two commissioners to resign from overseas during a minor "run" on the banks. (This was probably the trip referred to by Olive Shaw in 1962 as being in 1891 or 1892 "with wife, Eileen and Olive plus Effie, Eva and nurse").

There is much discussion in the literature about the commissioners being overly influenced by the temperance movement and investing heavily during the 1880s in coffee palaces including one which later became the Windsor Hotel.

In keeping with the boom and bust in Melbourne, Alfred's public life seems to have peaked in the late 1880s before declining through the 90s. It is family lore that he was caught in the bust in Victoria but it seems his Queensland business was devasted by flood and drought and there are references to landmark industrial relations cases involving his company there. This rise and fall parallelling the fortunes of the colonies needs a much closer look.

Occupation

With the assistance of a former employee, by then a senior partner in ironmongers Drake and Stubbs which had bought out his WA business, Alfred set up in Kalgoorlie. Entries appeared in the WA Post Office directory until 1901 for the "W A Hardware Company (Alfred Shaw - mgr) ironmongers etc". The address is given as Dugan Street until 1901 when he appears to have moved the business to the Exchange building in Hannan Street. Apparently it was not a success and the business was sold before he moved back to Perth.

Residence

We know that the family left Brighton for Perth in November 1894 and there a number of references to a house named «a href="../../Perth.htm" target=_blank»"Moss Lea" «/a» in Howick (later Hay) Street. From son Herbert's list of residences it seems Alfred and family may have been there until at least November 1895 when Herbert moved to a new address close by.

In the mid 1890s Alfred was busily expanding the business in «a href="../../ShawQueensland.htm" target=_blank»Queensland «/a» and an August 1896 item from the Tropiculturist refers to him and son Arthur giving Brisbane their special attention. It goes on to mention that Alfred was at that time in London and referred to his passing through America. This must be trip daughter Olive mentioned, "After a trip with wife and youngest child (Ailsa) he settled in Perth in 1898 .....", which would fit with this arrival in Fremantle on the SS Buninyong" on 26th January, 1898. It seems likely that he had extricated himself from his various business problems in the east during 1897.

Residence

According to his daughter Olive, he "left Kalgoorlie in November 1901 and rented a house in Applecross for two years. Lived briefly in South Perth, Kelmscott and Leederville and subsequently bought the house in Applecross where he died in 1908. Fortunes were pretty low in these years". The house in Applecross was in Fraser Road and when he first arrived there were only 12 houses in the area.

A former colleague from Melbourne visited him shortly before his death and reported that Alfred even at that late stage was considering a new career as a land agent.

Name

"Alfred Henry Shaw"

MiscBirthLaneLane
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ResidenceHuddersfield 1854Huddersfield 1854
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Religion19_Chapel_JPH223.jpg
19_Chapel_JPH223.jpg
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003_003B.jpg
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OccupationJoseph Shaw GravestoneJoseph Shaw Gravestone
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Note: Wesleyan B Melbourne General Cemetery
OccupationQueens Wharf, Melbourne, West End, 1857.Queens Wharf, Melbourne, West End, 1857.
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Note: Queens Wharf, Melbourne, West End, 1857.
OccupationShaw Family 1863Shaw Family 1863
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OccupationLittle Collins St looking east from Queen St 1870Little Collins St looking east from Queen St 1870
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OccupationCorner of Elizabeth and Little Collins St. 1870
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Note: Title: [Corner of Elizabeth and Little Collins St.] [picture]
OccupationAlfred Shaw & Co Warehouse 1871Alfred Shaw & Co Warehouse 1871
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Note: Creator: Winston, engraver.
ResidenceAbout 1880?About 1880?
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EventShaw & McNaughton Warehouse 1877Shaw & McNaughton Warehouse 1877
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OccupationAlfred Shaw & Co Brisbane
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OccupationBrisbane Exhibition 1876Brisbane Exhibition 1876
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DeathHiawatha c1885Hiawatha c1885
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ResidenceMid 1880s?Mid 1880s?
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OccupationGovenment Gazette 1888Govenment Gazette 1888
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Note: LANDATA
Occupation19_1901_0105KalgoorlieHannan.jpg
19_1901_0105KalgoorlieHannan.jpg
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ResidenceWith grandson Tom about 1904With grandson Tom about 1904
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Media objectA H Shaw (c1855?)A H Shaw (c1855?)
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Media objectAlfred Henry Shaw (c1880?)
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Media objectAlfred Henry Shaw (c1885?)Alfred Henry Shaw (c1885?)
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Image dimensions: 314 × 402 pixels
File size: 13 KB
Media objectc1905 with Tom Shawc1905 with Tom Shaw
Format: image/jpeg
Image dimensions: 445 × 291 pixels
File size: 17 KB
Media object1860s
Format: image/jpeg
Media objectc1880?c1880?
Format: image/jpeg
Image dimensions: 1,065 × 1,594 pixels
File size: 137 KB